Aspen Services

While any wartime veteran or their surviving spouse can apply for the VA Aid and Attendance Benefit through the help of a veteran service officer or a VA Accredited Attorney, the paperwork is lengthy, and the time spent preparing the paperwork can seem arduous.  American Patriot Service Corp, using their in-house attorney, has developed a system creating a quick turnaround time, shortening the time it takes to prepare the paperwork for filing.

American Patriot Service Corp has been helping wartime veterans and their families receive their hard-earned benefits for 7 years.  During that time APSC has helped over 3,500 families receive over $100 million in the VA Aid & Attendance Benefit.

Legally, anyone preparing the paperwork for the VA Aid & Attendance Benefit cannot charge a fee.   American Patriot Service Corp works on a unique Pay-It-Forward model.  As Rick Nelson, CEO of American Patriot Service Corp puts it, “A previous veteran and their family got us to the point where we can help you, we only ask that you pay-it-forward and help the next veteran.”  A suggested donation of $250 essentially covers the costs of preparing the paperwork.

There are three primary qualifications which must be met for the Veteran or a Veteran’s Surviving Spouse to receive the Aid & Attendance Benefit.

  1. The Vet must have served during a time of war.
  2. The VA requires the Vet or the Surviving Spouse to receive at least two of the activities of daily living or ADL’s which include:
  • Bathing/Showering
  • Assisting with Hygiene
  • Dressing
  • Toileting
  • Ambulation
  • Nursing Services
  • Physical/Mental Therapy
  1. Some income and net worth restrictions exist

An M.D. must examine the Claimant and certify they meet the medical conditions necessary to qualify for the benefit.

The VA Aid Attendance Benefit pays the Claimant (Veteran or Surviving Spouse) a monthly pension that can be used for paying both in-home caregivers, as well as assisted living and nursing facilities.   Family members taking care of the Claimant can qualify as a caregiver and be paid for the care they provide with some restrictions.

Current monthly pension amounts of the VA Aid and Attendance Benefit

  • Veteran $1,830
  • Surviving Spouse $1,176
  • Veteran and Spouse $2,170

Rick Nelson and his staff are passionate about helping our country’s wartime veterans and their surviving spouses receive the hard-fought benefits they deserve.

Visit the APSC webpage at www.apscnp.org or on Facebook www.facebook.com/apscnp

Contributed by APSC Membership Department
We Serve You “Because You Served U.S.”

Taking care of an elderly parent or relative is a heartwarming experience and it can enhance the lives of those you care for ten-fold. But even the most patient and attentive caregivers need a break from time to time. While some might argue that spending every minute you can with an ailing parent is the best use of your time, others would point to the growing concern around self-care and encourage caregivers to take time away as needed to replenish and regroup. Taking care of someone you love is a lot of work, and while it is incredibly rewarding, you need to take a break sometimes too. You might be worried about how to leave a family member you care for to take a vacation or break, but with these tips, you can be on your way.

Plan in Advance

Photo courtesy of Pixabay (Free-Photos)

Photo courtesy of Pixabay (Free-Photos)

You can’t know how long you are going to be caring for an ailing loved one, so it’s important to take the time you need when you need it. Start planning your vacation in advance so that you have plenty of time to ensure that everything is in order and looked after before you head out. Because you will need to find someone to care for your family member while you are away, you’ll want to give yourself plenty of lead-time to arrange for that additional care. Plus, if you are being paid for your time as a caregiver, consider how you can earn money to cover your time away from “work.” Giving yourself a few months notice allows you to save some of your money for such a vacation.

Talk to Other Family Members

When it comes to being paid for your time and effort as a caregiver, you’ll most likely need to plan to offer some form of payment to another family member who takes over. If your family member in care receives CDPAP, or another benefit, you may want to start putting some of those funds away now to ensure you have enough to cover the time away for additional care. You’ll want to organize a family meeting to discuss options for care while you are away. Keep in mind that family members might not want to take on the responsibility of caring for aging parents, even for a week, and they might expect you to find someone else to do the job while you are gone.

Hiring an Outside Source of Help

If it happens that your existing family members don’t want to pitch in to care for your aging parents while you are out of town, you might have to consider hiring an outside source of help. There are a number of home care services that can come for short or extended periods of time. You’ll need time to place an ad or contact an agency and arrange for an interview before leaving on your vacation.

Walk Through the Day

Photo courtesy Pixabay (silviarita)

Photo courtesy Pixabay (silviarita)

When you do find suitable care for your family member, whether that is another family member of an outside source of help, you’ll want to take the time to walk them through a typical day of care. It’s important to do this once or twice so that everyone is comfortable with the temporary situation. Remembering that this is just temporary will put everyone at ease. Elderly parents or family members might not want you to go away for a week or even longer, but because it is so important to maintain your self-care as a caregiver, you’ll need to come to terms with what leaving for a period of time means and decide to do it anyway. Taking time to acquaint new caregivers and your family member is important.

Finally, talk to your family member about how important it really is for you to be able to take time away from your job there and come back ready to tell them wonderful stories and share adventures with them. You need a break and while you might feel guilty about what that could feel like for your parents, remember again, that it is just temporary. And if you are really worried about taking time away from your family member, don’t go far so you can come at a moment’s notice if necessary. That way, you get a break, and you can sleep at night if you are worried about your parents or family members.

Contributed by Baruch Leifer

Freedom Care

In any relationship, it is important to foster trust, communication, and respect. This is especially true in a caregiving relationship. There are many ways to strengthen the caregiving relationship, and here are 3 essential keys to consider:

Respect-

Creating a relationship with the client and their family based off of mutual respect is one of the most important steps towards a strong caregiving team. Learning about the client and their needs builds a stronger understanding of what makes them feel safe, comfortable, and valued. Ren, an Aspen Senior Care client, mentions how this helps her grandfather. “The caregiver is sympathetic, accommodating, and has gotten to know my grandfather so they have a friendship. She brings newspaper clippings she finds funny and they sit and talk about life and the past.”

Respect in Caregiving Pixabay (Beesmurf)

Photo by Pixabay (Beesmurf)

Trust-

In caregiving, each person must know that they can count on one another and that they will be looking out for each other’s best interests. Kirsten, a caregiver with Aspen Senior Care says, “Trust is essential in caregiving because we want our clients and their families to be at ease knowing we will be dependable and honest in providing the best quality of care for them and their loved one.”

Communication-

It’s important for the caregiver and client to communicate well by listening to and understanding one another’s needs. Together you can determine what goals should be accomplished and ensure that each person is receiving the care they need. When both individuals know what to expect, misunderstandings and frustrations can be avoided.

Gary Staples, Owner of Aspen Senior Care recalls a situation where respect, trust, and communication turned a problematic situation with a client around for the better. 

“We had the opportunity of helping with a senior couple in their home. The husband was caring for his wife but was also dealing with his own dementia. At times he would become frustrated with the caregiver and accuse her of stealing his Irish Spring soap. Although she did not take the soap, he would insist she was stealing from him and he was quite upset.

The caregiver communicated with the daughter of the couple and the office staff to discuss the situation. The daughter understood that her father was confused and that the caregiver had not stolen anything. Unfortunately, her father would continue to accuse the caregiver each time she visited the home.  

The office staff thought long and hard about ways we could ease his worries and repair his trust in the caregiver. We came up with the idea of putting together a large tower of Irish Spring soap on a nice platter and tying it up with a large ribbon. We presented him with the gift and he was so delighted and grateful!

The tower remained on his coffee table where he could see it each day. From then on did not have any worries that the caregiver was stealing his soap!

Irish Spring Soap

By building a tower of Irish Spring soap, ‘a monument of trust’, we were able to show respect and sensitivity for our client and give him peace of mind in a way that he knew we cared.”

At Aspen Senior Care we value being professional in-home caregivers our clients can trust and rely on at all times. Going above and beyond to create a healthy relationship with our clients and their families is our number one priority.

To learn more about us or get caregiving support, call our office today at 801-224-5910.

Online Scheduling and More With eRSP

We believe that quality communication is key to providing quality care. Aspen’s scheduling system, eRSP, helps us greatly with quality communication with our professional caregivers and with the family caregivers of the clients we serve. It would be very challenging for us to do what we do without it!

Connect with eRSP  

Pixabay(StartupStockPhotos)

Photo by Pixabay(StartupStockPhotos)

Whether you are one of Aspen’s clients, a family caregiver, or one of our professional caregivers, our secure mobile app will give you the ability to:

  • Log in from anywhere and see every scheduled shift
  • Access caregiver profiles
  • Access client or caregiver schedules
  • See updates and notes from caregivers
  • Post updates and communicate with caregivers
  • Add tasks and appointments
  • Communicate with office staff

We know how important it is to feel connected and heard. We want to provide the latest and greatest tools to allow each member of our client’s care team to communicate with one another. eRSP ensures that the entire care team receives up-to-date information and stays connected with one another.

You can access Aspen’s eRSP scheduling system through our website. Just contact our scheduling team for assistance at 801-224-5910.

Our professional caregivers can download an app on their smartphones. Just go to the Google Play Store for Androids OR the App Store for iPhones, search for eRSP and download the eRSP mobile connect app. Then call our office at 801-224-5910 for more assistance.

There are many services available to help seniors who may need extra assistance. Unfortunately, this transition can be hard for those needing extra care. Some adults resist having strangers come into their home. Sometimes they do not want to attend an adult day program or move into a senior housing community. The senior who needs help may see these services as a loss of independence, an invasion of privacy, or are unwilling to pay for services.
 

Here are suggestions family caregivers have found helpful in making these transitions easier.

Listen and involve your loved oneHow can I get my family member to accept help?

Your loved one wants to have a say in what is happening with their care. Listen to their concerns and why they are fearful of accepting help.  Maybe they feel that their choice is being taken away from them. Perhaps they feel they have become a burden. Whatever it may be, express that you understand their concerns and that their feelings are valid Involve your loved one when choosing the in-home care company, adult day care program, or residential facility. Having a voice will help your family member feel more comfortable with the decision.

Take it Step-by-step

Next, take time to introduce the new assistance into your family member’s life. For example, begin by having an initial meeting with your loved one and an in-home care company. As your loved one builds a relationship with a caregiver, add hours and days throughout the week. A senior day center may be a better fit. Your family member can begin with two days per week to adjust to the new routine and structure.

Communicate your needs

Acknowledge your needs as a caregiver and express your thoughts to your loved one. Let them know that it helps ease your concerns when you know they are in good care. Confirm that you are still there to help and that you love them.

Be Respectful

In most cases, your loved one is in a place where they have the right to help make decisions for themselves. Their final decision may not fall in line with what you consider to be the best choice for everyone involved, especially if they have dementia. Encourage them to give the new change a try for two weeks and then evaluate after that. Be respectful and supportive. This may be a difficult time for them and they need your love and support.

Best of Home CareⓇ – Provider of Choice 20182018 Best of Home Care Provider of Choice

We happily announce that Aspen Senior Care has again won the Best of Home Care – Provider of Choice Award for 2018. That makes 9 years in a row!  We are one of the top home care agencies in the country and the only award-winning provider in Utah County!

We have absolute proof of quality of care as awarded by Home Care Pulse, a third party quality assurance company. Home Care Pulse interviews different clients or their family members each month. During the interview, our clients rate us in various categories such as:

  • Compassion of Caregivers
  • Recommend Provider
  • Confidence in Office Staff 
  • Communication from Provider
  • Daily Life
  • Work Ethic of Caregivers
  • Ability of Caregivers
  • Client/Caregiver Compatibility

These ratings compare with hundreds of other agencies across the nation. Only those with consistently high ratings are awarded Best of Home Care each year.

“This is not an easy award to win, but shows our dedication to our caregivers and our clients,” says Susan Johnson, Relations Manager. “It also shows our willingness to be transparent in all that we do.”

Certified – Trusted Providers commit to:Home Care Pulse - Trusted Provider

  • Actively gathering important feedback from their clients each month.
  • Using clients’ feedback to help them provide excellent care.
  • Giving you or your loved one the best in-home care possible.

We credit our fine team of compassionate caregivers and office staff for making us an ongoing award-winning agency. Thanks to our clients as well for providing ongoing feedback — both positive and constructive — each month. This helps us continually look to improve our services.

“Our team here at Aspen Senior Care are looking forward to another great year of providing quality service to seniors in our community! We are grateful to see our daily efforts to provide quality care to seniors recognized.”

-Gary Staples, Owner and Administrator

Aspen Senior Care Honored Among Top In-Home Senior Care Agencies in the Nation — Named “Caring Star of 2018” for Senior Care Service Excellence

CS - Aspen Senior Care awarded with Caring Star 2018

Aspen Senior Care is pleased to announce it has been selected as a “Caring Star of 2018” for top in-home senior care excellence. In ratings and reviews from family caregivers and cognitively healthy older adults, Aspen Senior Care earned a 5-star consumer rating (the highest possible score) within the last year, while also having a high volume of positive reviews and meeting other qualifying criteria for this national honor. Aspen Senior Care is the only Caring Star 2018 agency in Utah, and overall Aspen Senior Care is among 253 home care agencies across the nation who earned the Caring Stars 2018 distinction.

“Thanks to our clients and their families for providing ongoing positive and constructive feedback throughout each year! We are so grateful to be in your service. We appreciate Caring.com for recognizing us as a Caring Star of 2018.”

-Gary Staples, Owner and Administrator of Aspen Senior Care

Online reviews help families research and select the best senior care providers for aging or ailing loved ones. In multiple Caring.com research studies, the majority of family caregivers have indicated that they turn to the Internet and consumer reviews when narrowing their options among home care agencies in their area. Most say they have relied on these perspectives as much as or more so than in-person recommendations from geriatric professionals or medical personnel. Now entering its seventh year, the Caring Stars annual list helps consumers see which home care agencies are top rated by other families just like theirs – which is particularly helpful as families gather for the holidays and discover increased or urgent senior care needs for their parents or grandparents.

“Congratulations to Aspen Senior Care for achieving this award after earning accolades on Caring.com from clients and their loved ones,” said Karen Cassel, Caring.com CEO. “This important milestone speaks volumes about the positive difference Aspen Senior Care is making in serving older adults, and we celebrate their accomplishment.”

Some of the positive feedback that led to Aspen Senior Care being a Caring Star of 2018 includes:

“Aspen Senior Care has caring, good, and kind caregivers. Aspen Senior Care makes my life easier because I am with the client every day, and the services give me a break a couple nights out of the week.”

-Mary A.

“Aspen Senior Care is dependable, on-time, does a good job, and is interested in doing the best for you.”

-Elaine P.

“I have found that Aspen Senior Care is a dependable company and their caregivers are dedicated to their work. I have just one caregiver that comes to my home and she does really good work. She knows what I need and does it for me. I am 88 years old and appreciate any help that I get.”

-Bob H.

Read the full text of these reviews and others on Caring.com. Learn more about the Caring Stars program and view the complete winner list here.

About Aspen Senior Care

We specialize in trustworthy, caring, diligent caregivers who are qualified and well-trained to provide all of the services we offer. We have been awarded Best of Home Care for 8 years in a row and work hard to please our clients and provide peace of mind to their family members. We are the most established personal care agency in Utah Valley with many wonderful caregivers.

About Caring.com

With three million unique visitors to its website monthly, Caring.com is a leading senior care resource for family caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. Headquartered in San Mateo, CA, Caring.com provides helpful caregiving content, online support groups, and a comprehensive Senior Care Directory for the United States, with more than 150,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior living referral line at (800) 325-8591. Connect with Caring.com on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and/or YouTube.

Positive Consumer Ratings Led to this Industry-Leading Distinction from Caring.com

According to The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD), Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) refers to a progressive disease process which causes a group of brain disorders. These disorders result in cell damage to specific areas of the brain – the frontal lobes and/or the temporal lobes.  The atrophy of these nerve cells interferes with brain activity and causes a loss of function in these regions of the brain.

Frontotemporal Dementia is different from other types of dementia in two important ways:

  • The trademark of FTD is a gradual, progressive decline in behavior and language with memory usually remaining intact. As FTD progresses it gets more difficult for the person to plan or organize activities, interact with others appropriately, and care for themselves.
  • In the majority of cases, FTD occurs earlier in life in people between the ages of 45 to 65, although it has been seen in people as young as 21 and as old as 80.

Frontotemporal Dementia is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric problem or a movement disorder, such as Parkinson’s Disease. This is because certain symptoms of FTD mimic other diseases and in other cases, individuals are considered “too young” to have dementia.  According to AFTD, Alzheimer’s Disease is another possible misdiagnosis; however, the largest difference is that FTD affects language and behavior, while AD affects memory. 

Brain image of FTD vs Alz: image from medschool.ucsf.edu

Image from medschool.ucsf.edu

FTD makes up about 10%-20% of all dementia cases and the course of FTD ranges from 2 to over 20 years. The average length is about 8 years from the beginning of symptoms. It affects both men and women and, in some cases, can be inherited.

According to HealthLine.com, symptoms of FTD differ depending on the area of the brain affected, but most symptoms fall under behavior or language.

Common Frontotemporal Dementia behavioral issues include:

  • Loss of empathy
  • Inappropriate actions
  • Compulsive behavior
  • Lack of inhibition or restraint
  • Neglect of personal hygiene and care

Common Frontotemporal Dementia language-related symptoms include:

  • Difficulty speaking or understanding words
  • Problems recalling language
  • Loss of reading and writing skills
  • Difficulty with social interactions

Cognitive and Emotional symptoms of FTD include:

  • Difficulty planning, organizing, and/or executing activities
  • Becoming less involved in daily routines
  • Abrupt mood changes
  • Apathy
  • Emotional withdrawal
  • Becoming distracted
  • Reduced initiative

FTD Movement symptoms include:

  • A difference in gait, such as walking with a shuffle
  • Tremors
  • Muscle weakness, or cramps
  • Clumsiness
  • Apraxia (Loss of ability to make motions which are usually common and easy, such as using utensils)

Proper diagnosis is crucial because some medications used to treat other types of dementia may be harmful to a person with FTD. Unfortunately,  AFTD reports no cures at this time. However, research is ongoing and rapidly increasing, and new drugs are beginning to be clinically tested.  

Most importantly, remember that those dealing with any form of dementia are not doing these things on purpose. When providing care, caregivers sometimes trigger behaviors without realizing it. By understanding more about the many different types of dementia, caregivers can begin to improve quality and enjoyment of life at whatever stage of dementia a person happens to be in.

Visit The Association for FrontoTemporal Degeneration

AFTD helpline: 866-507-7222


Learn about different types of dementia in our other blog posts!

Understanding Dementia

Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

What is Vascular Dementia?

What is Lewy Body Dementia?

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Aspen Senior Care provides in-home care for seniors with all types of health challenges, including all forms of dementia.

Aspen Senior Day Center in Provo provides adult day care services (fun activities and personal care) for seniors with all types of dementia.

Contact Karen Rodgers, Family Caregiver Coach, for a free assessment to help you navigate the challenges of caregiving. You can reach her at 801-224-5910.

Visit aspenseniorcare.com or call our office at 801-224-5910 for more information.

It is helpful to begin by answering the question, what are Lewy bodies? Named after the scientist who discovered them, Lewy bodies are tiny abnormal protein deposits (also known as alpha-synuclein) found in the brain.

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) is caused when Lewy bodies build up in the brain’s nerve cells. Eventually, Lewy bodies overtake the cells and cause them to die. They are so small they can only be seen with a microscope and can affect any part of the brain. According to The Lewy Body Dementia Association, these Lewy bodies affect individual’s behavior, sleep, body movements, and the ability to reason and make decisions. 

Image of a Lewy body in a neuron of the brain.

Unfortunately, LBD is believed to be underdiagnosed. This is due to overlapping symptoms found in Alzheimer’s as well as Parkinson’s Disease. 

Although the symptoms of LBD are similar to these diseases, LBD affects the brain differently. Because of this, getting an accurate diagnosis is important in managing this type of dementia. Some medications used to treat Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia may actually cause dangerous and permanent side effects in people with LBD.

Three Presentations of Lewy body dementia

Lewy body dementia is a term used to describe three related clinical diagnoses:

  • There are some individuals who present with neuropsychiatric symptoms (hallucinations, issues with difficult mental activities, and behavioral problems) which lead to an initial LBD diagnosis.
  • Some people may be initially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease after experiencing movement disorders. Later they develop dementia and are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD).
  • Others will first experience memory and cognition disorders which can be mistaken as Alzheimer’s Disease. Over time these people develop more distinctive features of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), resulting in an accurate diagnosis of Lewy body dementia.  

According to The LBDA, “A rather arbitrary time cutoff was established to differentiate between DLB and PDD.  People whose dementia occurs before or within 1 year of Parkinson’s symptoms are diagnosed with DLB.  People who have an existing diagnosis of Parkinson’s for more than a year and later develop dementia are diagnosed with PDD.

Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia include:

  • Detailed visual hallucinations
  • Individuals may experience depression, anxiety, agitation or other behavioral or mood symptoms
  • Difficulty with movements such as walking, tremors, or stiffness
  • Difficulty sleeping, interruptions to sleep, or vivid dreams
  • Losing the ability to manage body functions such as bladder or bowel control, blood pressure, or body temperature

Because Lewy bodies can affect many different parts of the brain, there are multiple symptoms that can occur. As more and more nerve cells deteriorate, symptoms can increase and become worse.

Treatments

At this time there is not a cure for Lewy body dementia and the course of treatment will vary from person to person. Because each person experiences different symptoms, and each symptom requires a different form of treatment, it is important to seek medical advice from a doctor to determine the best plan of care.

How you can help your loved one 

A woman with her arm around a friend

Learn what you can do to support your loved one.

The Alzheimer’s Society recommends developing tactics which may assist individuals who are experiencing symptoms. Making lists, writing events on the calendar, or setting reminder alarms can be good techniques to use for memory loss. Walks or other active daytime activities may help with sleep disturbances. Seeking professionals such as neurologists, or physical therapists may help with movement symptoms.

It is also recommended to reassure those experiencing hallucinations that you are there to help them and not that what they are experiencing is not real.

Most importantly, remember that those dealing with any form of dementia are not doing these things on purpose. When providing care, caregivers sometimes trigger behaviors without realizing it. By understanding more about the many different types of dementia, caregivers can begin to improve quality and enjoyment of life at whatever stage of dementia a person happens to be in.

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Learn about different types of dementia in our other blog posts!

Understanding Dementia

Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

What is Vascular Dementia?

What is Frontotemporal Dementia?

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Aspen Senior Care helps seniors with all types of dementia. We provide professional caregivers to assist them in their homes and to give the family caregivers the break they need.

Aspen Senior Day Center in Provo provides adult day care services (fun activities and personal care) for seniors with all types of dementia.

Contact Karen Rodgers, Family Caregiver Coach, for a free assessment to help you navigate the challenges of caregiving. You can reach her at 801-224-5910.

When a person is diagnosed with dementia, it affects the whole family.  Most families don’t know where to begin when it comes to finding help and resources.  Taking a team approach to dementia care is the best way to support families as they support their loved ones.

What is a team approach?

When we think about a team, we think about individuals working together towards the same goal. For families caring for a loved one with dementia, the goal is to provide good care as the disease progresses and also to support each other. Life doesn’t stand still for family members caring for their loved one. Families need to be able to continue with their hopes and dreams, even if some of those hopes and dreams have changed due to their loved one’s illness.We love working with our clients! It takes a team approach!

This is why a team approach to dementia care is so important.  There are agencies here in Utah County that share the same caregiving and quality-of-life goals for people with dementia that caregiving families have.  They offer dementia care education, respite care, and other kinds of support to these families.

Knowing where to find these resources can sometimes be a challenge, especially for families who have just received a diagnosis of dementia. This is where a caregiver coach can be of help.

A Caregiver Coach

Teams usually have a coach – someone who helps the team members by providing education, guidance, and support to help the team succeed. A Caregiver Coach helps families caring for loved ones with dementia. There are many resources available for such families –  the challenge is knowing where to find this information and what applies to their situation.

Each family caring for a loved one with dementia has unique challenges. A caregiver coach meets one on one with family caregivers and helps them find the right resources for them.

A family caregiver coach can:

  • educate families about the type of dementia their loved one has
  • offer ideas for creating a safe home environment
  • be a listening ear for caregiver challenges and frustrations
  • help problem solve challenging behaviors and situations
  • find support groups the caregiver might feel comfortable attending
  • help families access respite, in-home care, and adult day programs in the area.

    Caregiving takes a team

Aspen is here to help

The caregiving journey doesn’t have to be made alone. There are people who want to help and who know from experience the challenges families face. Aspen Senior Care takes a team approach to dementia care and wants to help you meet your caregiving goals. This is why we have a Caregiver Coach to help families meet the challenges of caregiving.  Meeting with our caregiver coach is a complimentary service we offer. To find out more about this service please call 801-224-5910. We are here to help!

 

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Learn about different types of dementia in our other blog posts!

Understanding Dementia

Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

What is Vascular Dementia?

What is Lewy Body Dementia?

What is Frontotemporal Dementia?