Caregiver Tips

Many seniors have found that working out in the water is an excellent way to improve their overall well-being, from providing various physical benefits to offering social time and a trip out of the house. The unique properties of water provide seniors with the opportunity to get relief from painful physical conditions such as arthritis and circulatory problems while deriving the benefits of low-impact exercise in an environment that minimizes the risk of injury.

Why Water?

Cardiovascular exercise and weight loss are common benefits of any aerobic exercise, but exercising while submerged in water provides some distinct advantages that set aquatic exercise apart from land-based activity. Age-related joint conditions like arthritis can be a painful impediment to a senior’s capability (and enthusiasm) for exercising. But water-based exercise puts significantly less stress on joints, allowing them to enjoy these activities for longer periods of time, and can also provide some relief from these chronic conditions. Swimming can also be relaxing and meditative, which may offer some stress relief, adding to its cardiovascular benefits.

Swimming Pool

The Physical Benefits of Water Exercise

Cardio: It doesn’t matter if a senior is water-jogging or swimming—using the water to get their heart rate up will increase aerobic capacity, burn fat, and decrease their risk for heart disease.

Balance: Reduced muscle tone and vision loss can affect senior coordination and increase their risk of falling. Aquatic exercise is a great way to help improve balance. Doing specific balance exercises in water helps build strength and coordination. Water provides the ideal environment for this type of exercise, safely allowing for a loss of balance since their water-induced buoyancy will prevent them from falling.

Strength: Working with water “barbells” or wrist bands can provide a great form of resistance training which helps build muscle strength and endurance without injury.

Work Out and Get Out

Socializing is an overlooked added benefit of many types of senior group activity, and aquatic exercise is a prime opportunity to get out of the isolation of the home and into a social environment—and in the case of outdoor pools, enjoying some sun (with sun protection, of course).

Studies have shown that the opportunity to socialize is one of the key reasons older adults will maintain a successful exercise program. Group exercise classes provide an ideal opportunity for conversation.

Whether that be an exercise class, individual standing exercises, or swimmers using kickboards to kick side-by-side, there are many opportunities in the pool to socialize.

Getting Started

If you haven’t been swimming in a while, start slowly. Try swimming laps for just five to ten minutes while coordinating your breathing, strokes, and kicking. A pair of well-fitting goggles is a must. A less strenuous option is just walking or running in the water. Water aerobics classes are offered at a variety of levels, and often specifically for seniors. Check out your local senior center, community center, or YMCA for their Summer offerings for seniors.

Article by Caren Parnes for The Senior’s Choice

In today’s modern and tech-savvy world, more and more people are embracing technology, seniors included. Close to 70 percent of the elderly are now connected to the internet. Undeniably, technology for seniors is growing in popularity and has shown no signs of slowing down.

Nowadays, tech devices have become an integral part of the daily life of most seniors. These ingenious technologies have allowed them to move around, connect with loved ones, and live healthier, fulfilling, and more connected lives.

Invaluable Tech Solutions for Seniors

From managing medications and sleep to assistance with day-to-day life, here are some of the most innovative technologies that have made life easier for seniors:

A photo of a phone, headphones, and a watch.

Hero Digital Pill Dispenser

Hero digital pill dispenser is designed to dispense a senior’s medication at a scheduled time each day. The Hero digital pill dispenser can hold up to 10 different kinds of pills of various shapes and sizes. It can also be tailored to any medication schedule.

The digital pill dispenser can store up to 90 days of medication supply, depending on the pill’s size. This digital pill dispenser is also connected to the Hero app, which tracks the pills’ consumption and doses.

The Hero digital pill dispenser won’t accept half pills, gummies, and sticky dissoluble pills to avoid contamination.

Additional Features

  • 30-day free trial
  • Password protected
  • HIPAA-compliant security for all data
  • Free shipping and returns
  • Notifications (when medication is low)
  • Free software update

Amazon Echo Dot (3rd Generation)

This smart and compact speaker has many senior-friendly abilities and features. Apart from being voice-activated, it is also small, so they can take it anywhere. This imaginative device can also be used to:

  • Stream music
  • Play games
  • Check the weather
  • Receive news updates
  • Set alarms for medications
  • Chat
  • Create grocery lists

When set up to guard the home, this additional feature included in the Alexa app provides seniors alerts about smoke alarms, broken glass, and carbon monoxide.

Additional Features

  • Hands-free calls
  • Privacy Protection
  • Voice control (turn on lights, adjust thermostats, and lock doors)

COWIN E7 Active Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Over-Ear Headphones

If your senior loved one has hearing loss, the COWIN E7 can be a great option. Its advanced active noise reduction technology is designed to cancel lower frequencies. This gives them the ultimate listening experience when they listen to their favorite music or podcasts or watching their favorite movies.

COWIN E7 also comes with Bluetooth technology that makes hands-free listening possible.

Additional Features

  • 30-hour battery life
  • High-quality built-in microphone
  • 90 degrees swiveling ear cups
  • Professional padding
Elderly woman wearing headphones and using a cell phone

GrandPad

This easy-to-use tablet is designed primarily for seniors and comes with built-in wireless data. It allows them to listen to music, video chat with their loved ones, and play games with the utmost ease.

This breakthrough technology also allows seniors access to their own private family network where approved friends and loved ones can update contact information and add photos.

The GrandPad is also a practical gift for seniors who are not tech-savvy since it won’t require passwords and won’t need any modem.

Additional Features

  • Unlimited support team access
  • Safe from spams and scams
  • Has enlarged text for easy reading
  • Sends voice-automated emails

Tile Sticker

Seniors who always lose everyday items would sure love Tile Sticker. Tile Sticker is placed on wallets, keys, remotes, and other things that can easily be misplaced. When seniors need to find their lost items, they need to use the company’s app on their phones to locate them.

The Tile Sticker has a Pro version that’s recommended for valuable items. It comes with a Bluetooth range of 400 feet.

Additional Features

  • 3-year battery life
  • Free shipping
  • 30-day guarantee
  • Waterproof

Fitbit Versa 2

The Fitbit Versa 2 is a health manager and versatile watch rolled into one. It comes with a heart-rate tracker and provides easy access to information and apps. You can also use it to listen to unlimited music on Spotify, track the weather, and set alarms. What’s even impressive? They can use it to pay the bills while on the go.

Additional Features

  • Personalized clock face
  • Fitbit pay
  • Sleep tracker
  • 24/7 heart rate tracking
  • Built-in Amazon Alexa

Ring Video Doorbell

Ring designs doorbell camera systems that provide notifications to smartphones in real-time when motion sensors are triggered or when visitors ring the doorbell. This product will not only help ensure their safety, it can also help make life easy for seniors.

With the Ring Video Doorbell, they can speak to visitors anytime and anywhere. The device can also be used to monitor the doors around the home. Custom motion settings can be set. Safety and crime alerts can also be sent directly to a smartphone.

Additional Features

  • Advanced motion settings
  • 1080 HD video and two-way talk
  • Night vision

Conclusion

It is reassuring to know that many innovative technologies are now available to help make life easy for seniors. While some technologies require some getting used to, they are a massive step in the right direction for improving their quality of life.

Melissa Andrews - Paradise Living Centers

About the Author

Melissa Andrews is the Content Marketing Strategist for Paradise Living Centers, an assisted living center for seniors with locations in Paradise Valley and Phoenix, Arizona. In her spare time, she enjoys cooking and going on hiking trips with her siblings and cousins.

Debbie Booth with Adult Protective Services (Utah) provides our caregivers with training on the Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of Vulnerable Adults.

What does “abuse” mean? Abuse can refer to any situation in which someone who has more power hurts someone with less power. It may include:

  • Verbal Abuse — saying mean or cruel things to you.
  • Physical Abuse — hurting you intentionally.
  • Emotional Abuse — hurting your feelings intentionally, scaring you, or deliberately making you feel guilty about matters you cannot control.
  • Sexual Abuse — inappropriate touching or speaking about sexual matters.
  • Neglect — withholding things that you need (inappropriately) or refusing to take you to the doctor when you need to go.
  • Exploitation — taking advantage of you, your money or belongings.

It is important to know that reporting elder abuse in Utah is mandatory. You can describe and report the current situation of Physical Abuse, Emotional Abuse, Neglect, Exploitation, or Self Neglect and choose to remain anonymous if you desire. 

Watch the video to learn more about how to be aware of cases of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable adults.

Please Note: This training contains images of sensitive content pertaining to the abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable adults. If you do not prefer to view this content, please reach out to the office for other training material at 801-224-5910.

Reach out to Debbie Booth at debooth@utah.gov with any questions. All reports of abuse will be considered serious and investigated to the fullest extent.

Adult Protective Services (APS)
Salt Lake County — 801-583-3567
Statewide — 1-800-371-7897
Web — daas.utah.gov

By: Dr. Jessica Peterson, Au.D CCC-A
Founder and Owner of Audiology Consults LLC — www.audiologyconsults.com

Hearing health can be difficult to understand and manage.  In today’s world, there are many venues to receive hearing health care. Technology can also differ greatly due to an increasing number of hearing aid varieties. As a clinical audiologist, I educate my patients about maintaining their hearing devices and how to maintain their overall hearing health.  Hearing aids, cochlear implants, and your ears all need routine care.  Your daily communication will be greatly improved if you take the time to understand both the technology you are using and how to manage your hearing loss.

1. Routine Hearing Test

Hearing testing should be done routinely.  The majority of hearing loss occurs gradually.  It can be difficult to perceive if a hearing loss has occurred to even the most discerning patient.  Having a baseline hearing test, followed by further testing will ensure that small changes are detected early.  Early detection of hearing loss is important. Studies show that early treatment of hearing loss will significantly improve outcomes. Hearing aids will benefit you even with a mild hearing loss.  Our ears are the gateway to our auditory cortex.  The auditory cortex is the part of the brain that makes sense of the sounds around us.  The auditory cortex is similar to a muscle, and just like your muscles would shrink if you decided to not lift weights, the function of your auditory cortex will decrease function if the sound stimulus is decreased.  Even a mild hearing loss will start to change the way the brain reacts to sound, and if you delay treatment too long regaining the same function will be more difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve.

Some signs that your hearing may have changed:

  • You are asking people to repeat themselves more than before.
  • You have been feeling like people mumble when they speak.
  • Your television has to be increased in volume for you to hear it well.
  • It is more difficult to hear in background noise than it used to be.

2. Technology Management

If you have hearing loss and are wearing technology such as hearing aids or a cochlear implant, routine maintenance is essential.  It is possible that your hearing may change over time and the devices may need to be adjusted.  In addition, Hearing aids are small electronic devices that sit in your ear where there is sweat and wax.  To ensure they are functioning properly, it is important to have them professionally cleaned from time to time and to have your ears looked at to ensure the skin inside remains healthy and that no wax blockages are occurring.

Photo by Mark Paton on Unsplash
Photo by Mark Paton on Unsplash

3. Communication Strategies

Hearing aides are one part of an effective communication plan.  Another important part of communication is relying on other visual cues like facial expressions and body language.  When tested, most people perform better when they are able to watch the speaker’s face.  Although you may not be conscious of it, seeing a speaker’s face will help you understand what they say, even when you did not clearly hear what they said.   

Background noise is troublesome for speech comprehension because the signal is difficult to detect.  Picture deer on an empty hillside.  With no other objects, it is easy to see.  Now picture the same hillside but with several trees and bushes around the deer.  The task of finding the deer in the trees is more difficult than finding the deer on the empty hillside.  Our ears have the same problem.  When background noise is present it is harder for our ears to focus on the speech we care about.  It takes more work for us to understand speech in the midst of background noise.  Because the task takes more work, it will create auditory fatigue.  Many people experience auditory fatigue but with even a mild hearing loss, the task of listening is more difficult, and auditory fatigue may happen more quickly.  

These are some rules that you can incorporate into your communication routines to give yourself every advantage for communication.  While these things may seem like common sense, they are easy to forget.

Communication Strategies:

  • The speaker should have your full attention before launching into a lengthy speech.
  • Face the speaker so that you have access to visual cues.
  • Make sure you are in the same room with the person you are talking to.
  • Try to dedicate yourself to listening, multi-tasking can make understanding more difficult
  • Reduce background noise when possible.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask someone to repeat or rephrase if you didn’t understand.

4. Hearing Health Education

Fully understanding your hearing loss, your hearing test, how to make a communication plan, hearing aid technology, and the hearing aid process is essential to making sure you are getting the most out of your hearing.  A frequent misunderstanding is that hearing aids only will fix hearing loss.  Hearing loss is complex and requires technology in conjunction with deliberate communication strategies

It is important for the patient, their family, their caregivers, friends, and others to understand how to navigate communication.  Many audiologists and hearing instrument specialists are excellent at providing patient education but are limited by appointment times. Due to the lack of easily accessible education on hearing loss I have created an online course that walks you through all of these topics in depth.  If you would like to learn more about hearing loss, hearing aids, communication strategies, the process for managing hearing loss and more, I would encourage you to join me in my course.  You can find the course at www.audiologyconsults.com.  You may also contact me  there if you would like to connect or have questions.

Trifocal lenses improve distant, intermediate, and nearby sight issues. You might be aware of the far and near sight issues and their relevant corrections. But the intermediate vision, too, is essential for most of our everyday tasks. To cater to all three, trifocal, as the name suggests, consists of three separate lenses that re-establish a complete vision range. 

Ideally, trifocal lenses work for people over the age of forty who are suffering from existing conditions or have developed presbyopia due to age. They are made up of an anti-reflective layer to promote the comfort of thoroughly clear eyesight. The coating provides better vision in low-light situations. 

Whether you are finding a good solution for yourself or a senior loved one, a local eye doctor will be able to help you understand if a trifocal lens is a suitable option. 

Advantages of Trifocal Lenses

These multi-purpose lenses have a range of benefits:

  • These are three-in-one correction lenses saving you from the hassle of managing multiple glasses. 
  •  Enable a broader viewing area in case of nearer vision. That makes it easier to use a screen or read with reduced strain on the eyes in case of dimmed surround lights. 
  • From the beginning, you will experience enhanced visibility and brightness in the colors around you. 
  • Trifocal glasses offer you the ability to see adequately in all kinds of lighting conditions, including dim lighting, bright lights, low light, and even daylight.
  • Another significant aspect is that you will endure fewer glares from bright lights, which will make driving at night easier for a lot of people. 

Disadvantages of Trifocal Lens

As is the usual practice, here I am presenting the other side of the story as well for better perception:

  • Since trifocal lenses correct multiple sight problems simultaneously, you might experience some visibility issues when seeing through another section of your glasses.
  • The trifocal lens within the case of cataract IOL might cause reactions such as blurred sight or intolerable glare because of the presence of the implant.
  • Unlike progressive lenses, there is no possibility of customizing these glasses. 

How to use them?

It is essential to note that the trifocal lenses are easy to use. Below are some of the measures you can take to make the transition convenient:

  • Learn the proper technique of using your new glasses from your optometrist and make sure they fit you well. 
  • They should be well adjusted on your nose to avoid slipping, and for you see through them appropriately.
  • Always ensure that you continue looking in front and not downwards when walking. That will avoid vision distortions due to the glasses.
  • When reading something, it should be held at a convenient distance for you to be able to read it properly without much strain.

Can anyone use trifocal glasses? 

Although they can overcome a variety of visibility issues, trifocal do have their limitations. In patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), advanced glaucoma, diabetes, and cataracts, the trifocal lenses are not a suitable solution.

The ideal candidates for trifocal lenses are people over forty who are suffering from presbyopia that prompts them to need to change or begin their eyeglass prescriptions. Trifocal glasses can restore enhanced visibility in all ranges and can be chosen as an alternative to avoid correction surgeries. 

If so far, you have been able to figure out that you need trifocal glasses, you can go a step further by visiting an eye doctor in your local area. They will be able to understand your prevalent eye ailments and then prescribe the most suitable lens options for you. Remember, trifocal glasses and contacts ensure a close-up, intermediate, and faraway view. 

Aaron Barriga

Author Bio:

Aaron Barriga is the online marketing manager for Insight Vision Center, eye care center, Fresno. With a knack for understanding medical procedures, and an interest in eye and vision health, Aaron loves to share what he knows and what he learns. He blogs to inform readers about the latest eye care technology and other topics related to eye care, especially LASIK. Aaron loves collecting coasters from the different bars and restaurants he visits during his travels.

For most of us, aging comes with increased health issues, thoughts of our own mortality and sometimes watching the ones we love—friends and family—pass away. It becomes very easy to fall into depression and depression can lead to a variety of physical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems and diabetes. That’s where the power of positive thinking comes in. Positive thoughts condition our brain to think positively and our body follows the command of our brain.

For older seniors a caregiver plays an important role in maintaining positive thoughts and healthy aging. Caregivers are trained to watch for warning signs of depression like loss of interest in daily activities and restlessness. With careful observation, caregivers can help to stave off depression by offering companionship and promoting fun, happy, activities like gardening and dancing or offering transportation to social events and church.

Here are some tips to maintain a positive frame of mind—for both caregivers and their charges:

  • Cultivate enthusiasm. Do your best to be happy and not to indulge in negative thoughts. The glass can be half full or half empty—it’s always the same glass. 
  • Keep a sense of humor. Perhaps more than any other strategy, finding something to laugh about is an effective buffer for the difficulties we face in life.
  • Show gratitude. Everyday find something to be grateful for. The shoes on your feet. The food on your plate. The flowers in your garden.
  • Be compassionate. Put yourself in other people’s shoes. Understanding leads to acceptance.
  • Be flexible. Understanding that things are not always going to go the way you would like and being comfortable changing course is a life skill worth practicing.
  • Have faith. Whether it be a belief in a force beyond yourself or the belief in the best possible outcome for a situation, maintaining faith in things beyond your control is crucial to a positive outlook.
  • Dream. Engage in “imagineering.” Set a goal. Aim high.
  • Learn from mistakes. If we approach life as an opportunity to learn and grow, even negative experiences provide a positive take-away.
  • Take joy in helping others. Helping others and touching lives can be a huge source of satisfaction in our lives. Knowing that you’ve made a difference in someone’s life can bring nothing but positive thoughts.
  • Cultivate acceptance. Work to accept adversity and disappointments—they are an inevitable part of our journey. If you can overcome and accept what you cannot change you will emerge the stronger for it.
  • Think “love” first. Develop a loving and forgiving attitude to everyone around you. It will come back to you ten-fold.
 — Written by Caren Parnes for The Senior’s Choice
Aspen Senior Care is a proud member of the Senior’s Choice Network

It’s summertime! This season brings fun outdoor activities and beautiful — but hot — weather. Did you know the senior community is often more prone to the effects of heat and therefore at a greater risk for dehydration? Now is a good time to focus on helping our elderly loved ones stay safe, healthy, and hydrated through the elevated summer heat. 

Causes of dehydration

Dehydration happens when the body does not receive or retain the adequate amount of fluid needed to function properly. If not treated properly, dehydration can cause severe health issues. Common causes include:

  • Intense summer heat
  • Strenuous activity
  • Medications or diuretics 
  • Drinks which contain caffeine or alcohol
  • Illness which cause fever, vomiting, or diarrhea

What should you look for?

Common warning signs of dehydration may include the following: 

  • Thirst
  • Confusion
  • Irritability
  • Headache
  • Dizziness or feeling faint
  • Low blood pressure
  • Dry skin and/or poor skin elasticity
  • Not urinating frequently or dark urine

What you can do to help seniors stay hydrated?

  • Always check with a doctor to make sure your loved one is getting the right amount of fluids for their individual health needs.
  • Create a set fluid intake schedule. If necessary, set timers to help remind your loved one to drink fluids throughout the day. Try to decrease fluids that are high in caffeine or sugar. 
  • Offer sufficient fluids at every meal. This can also include fruits and vegetables with high water content such as watermelon, cantaloupe, and cucumbers. 
  • Keep water within easy reach of chairs and beds.
  • Check urine to ensure it is light in color. 
  • Offer a full glass of fluid with medication. 
  • Monitor skin elasticity each day. 
  • Monitor the environment. Close blinds and windows to reduce indoor heat, and make sure the air conditioning is on a set schedule and working well. If outdoors, make sure there is a cool, shady place to sit. 

It is important to recognize the causes and symptoms of dehydration and know ways to help your elderly loved one stay hydrated. And don’t forget to utilize these tips for your own health as well. After all, you both deserve to have a healthy and happy summer! For more caregiving tips and information, visit our blog.

For many older adults, mobility limitations, health issues and low energy can keep them from the social engagement they once enjoyed. Especially in seniors who live alone, social isolation can lead to loneliness, depression and poor physical health. Pet therapy has been shown to benefit seniors by improving depression and anxiety symptoms, increasing self-care, and even improving heart-health. It turns out giving and receiving unconditional love is literally good for your heart.

Proven Benefits of Pet Companionship

The Pets for the Elderly Foundation, a nationwide charity committed to connecting seniors with therapy animals, has collected research on pet therapy for seniors. These studies discuss the physiological and psychological impact of animals on seniors’ quality of life. Here are their findings:

Physical Benefits

Heart Health—Frequent interaction with a pet can lower blood pressure and cholesterol, decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Improved Activity—Walking, grooming or playing with a pet increases the frequency of physical activity and exercise, which in turn has countless health benefits.

Healthy Behavior—Those who own a pet tend to take better care of themselves. Caring for a pet helps to develop a routine, encouraging owners to eat regularly or complete chores and other tasks.

Social & Emotional Benefits

Increased Interaction—Walking a dog gets senior owners out of the house and increases their opportunities to socialize with neighbors.

Decreased Loneliness—Pets provide companionship, giving isolated seniors a source for affection, conversation and activity.

Stress Relief—Being with a pet increases levels of serotonin, the “feel good” hormone that relieves stress. It also provides physical contact, which helps to calm anxiety.

Better Self-Esteem —For seniors discouraged by their age, appearance or limited abilities, pets are welcome company, reminding seniors that they are still capable of being loved and needed.

Sense of Purpose—The company of an animal provides a reason to get up in the morning. Pets combat depression symptoms by eliminating feelings of worthlessness or helplessness. Knowing that they are loved and needed enhances seniors’ mental health.

Things to Consider Before Getting a Pet

If you think your loved one would benefit from owning a pet, ask yourself these questions to help you make a wise decision:

What is the best choice for a pet? If your loved one has trouble walking or is more limited in their ability to provide constant attention to a pet, a cat might be a better choice than a dog.

Is my loved one an experienced pet owner?

Taking on the responsibilities of owning a pet could be overwhelming for a senior who has never had one before.

Photo by Snapwire from Pexels

Are finances an issue? Consider your loved one’s financial situation. Animal care can be expensive, and if your loved one is on a fixed income, owning a pet could cause financial burdens. Assess the costs before you commit.

Choose the right pet. Do your research to find a pet whose age, size, personality and energy level fit well with your loved one’s.

Could I adopt an animal in need? Older animals in shelters have a lower adoption rate than puppies or kittens and have a greater risk of being euthanized. Adopting an adult, healthy pet for your loved one can eliminates the stress of training, match your loved one’s energy level and save the life of a loving animal.

By Caren Parnes

For the Senior’s Choice

Before the pandemic that is COVID-19, staying in touch with a loved one in senior living was hard. Now that precautions such as social distancing are in place, those challenges have now become harder. A lack of connection brought on by today’s conditions has elevated stress and created a sense of loneliness amongst both elderly parents and their adult children. Here are eight simple ways to stay connected during these tough times:

Send Them Care Packages

Send your loved on a package filled with their favorite items, personal belongings, and even memorable items such as photos and postcards to make them feel involved. Another way of doing so is by creating themed care packages centered around a memory or even a holiday. Regularly sending thought out care packages can make your loved one feel cared for, thought of, and involved. 

Regular Video Calls

We are fortunate to live in a period in which technology makes it easy to stay connected. Set up a weekly time to video call with your loved one. Video calls are ideal since they allow both of you to see each other. They can make the distance more bearable and will enable you to show them things going on at home. It also allows you to get your family together to video chat together.

Play a Game Together

Smartphones have changed how we play games. With thousands of multi-player games available, you can now bond over even more. Pick out a smartphone game that both of you will enjoy. Games can further enhance how you bond together and give you more to talk about. If your loved one doesn’t have a smartphone, computer games are an alternative. 

Get Them a Pet

Pets are a great way to ease loneliness. If possible, get your loved one a pet to keep them company. If they are able, take your loved one to the store to pick out their pet. Not only will this create a great memory, but it will add even more meaning to the pet. Having a pet will keep them busy and offer a form of companionship.

Photo by John-Mark Smith from Pexels

Collaborate with Their Caregiver

Caregivers offer a unique insight into your loved one’s progress. They regularly interact with them, which makes them a good source of ideas and inspiration. Develop a relationship with your loved one’s caregiver to keep track of their progress, any possible issues, and possible ways to make them happy and content. 

Send Good Morning and Goodnight Texts

This simple tip can make a world of difference. Daily communication can be a struggle considering how crazy life can get. Simple good morning and good night texts can let your loved one know you’re thinking about them. It can also serve as a way to share with them what you’re up to and open the door up for conversation. 

Plan Out Future Trips

Planning out a future trip with your loved one can help take their mind off any current troubles they may be having. It can serve as a way to get through tough times and give them something to look forward to. And because trips often require planning, it provides your loved one something to do to make time pass. A great bonus is planning out trips that may be on their bucket list. Bucket list trips add even more connection and excitement. 

Make Every Conversation Meaningful

Day-to-day conversations can lose their effect because they lack substance. Be sure to make every conversation meaningful by talking about their progress, your progress, reminiscing, showing compassion, and making sure they know they’re loved. It’s essential to do so, so they don’t feel that staying connected is a chore for you.

These eight tips can help both you and your loved one get through these tough times and even strengthen your relationship. It can be overwhelming to get started, but writing down ideas and a list of your loved one’s hobbies and interests can be a great way to get started. 

About the Author

Brandon Landgraf is a digital marketing manager and content creator for Carex Health Brands, a health and wellness brand whose mission is to improve the lives of others. He enjoys writing content that empowers others to live better, be healthier, and lead happy lifestyles.

The heat of summer is here, so this is a good time to review some vital safety tips for seniors.  Elderly persons are more prone to the effects of heat and at greater risk for dehydration. Make sure you or someone you can trust is checking in on your elderly family members. 

• Try to plan activities that
require going outside during non-peak hours when it might be a little cooler.

• Move exercise indoors. 
Consider exercising at a gym, walking on a treadmill, or “mall walking” instead
of outdoor walks or activities. Swimming and water aerobics are good options as
well.

• Drink plenty of fluids
(non-alcoholic, caffeine-free as these ingredients have a diuretic effect).
Talk with your doctor if you take medications that affect fluid intake, such as
Lasix.

• Stay indoors, in cooled spaces
as much as possible. Check your loved one’s air-conditioning system, and do a
maintenance review. If electricity goes out, or your loved one does not have
air conditioning, consider alternative arrangements when heat is at dangerous
levels.

• Be aware of signs of
dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay (MabelAmber) Senior Couple
Photo courtesy of Pixabay (MabelAmber) Senior Couple

The most common signs of dehydration in the elderly are thirst, confusion, irritability, and poor skin elasticity. Keeping hydrated on a regular basis is the most important preventative measure, and individuals should be encouraged to drink fluids even when not thirsty as thirst may not be triggered until already dehydrated. Heat and dehydration may make seniors more prone to dizziness and falls and can cause or increase confusion. Heat exhaustion is the more mild form of heat-related illness. Warning signs may include the following: Heavy sweating; Paleness; Muscle Cramps; Fatigue; Weakness; Dizziness; Headache; Nausea or vomiting; Fainting. The skin may be cool and moist. The pulse rate may be fast and weak. Breathing may be fast and shallow.

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Warning signs may include the following: An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F); Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating); Rapid, strong pulse; Throbbing headache; Dizziness; Nausea. Any indication of heat stroke is a medical emergency. Seek immediate medical attention.

Be aware of other summer dangers. Talk with
your loved one about alternatives if he/she handles maintenance around the
home, such as yard work or cleaning gutters. This may be especially
dangerous in the heat, but may also pose general risks for falling and safety.
Be vigilant about sunscreen and protect against insect bites. If you or someone
you know has a bite that seems abnormal or you notice any unusual symptoms,
seek medical attention.

Contributed By Caren Parnes, for The Senior’s Choice