Hospice

Has your loved one recently transitioned into the care of a hospice agency? While a hospice agency may alleviate some of your caregiving duties, you may notice that additional support in the home would be beneficial. This is where enlisting the help of a personal care agency may be the perfect solution.

Personal care agencies like Aspen Senior Care often get confused with hospice care, but they aren’t the same. It’s important for families caring for elderly loved ones to know the difference and how both agencies complement each other.

What is the difference?

Personal care services provide one-on-one non-medical support in a person’s home which allows them to stay safely at home while under the care of a professional caregiver. Professional caregivers provide assistance 24/7 with activities of daily living, personal care, companionship, night care, and respite care for family caregivers. It is customized care to fit the needs and desires of the person and their family. This type of care is usually paid privately and/or by long-term-care insurance.

The purpose of hospice is to provide the highest quality of medical care and comfort to those who are chronically ill, terminally ill, or seriously ill and to relieve or lessen the discomfort they may experience. This may include medical care to alleviate pain, counseling and grief support for the patient and their family. In most cases, hospice care for seniors is covered by Medicare and includes several 1-hour visits per week by CNA’s, nurses, and other professionals.

How do they work hand-in-hand?

Personal care companies like Aspen Senior Care provide a few of the same services that hospice agencies provide, plus a lot of services they do not provide. When hospice care sends a CNA 2 to 3 times a week for an hour to help with bathing, personal care agencies like Aspen Senior Care can fill in the gaps and provide consistent care and peace of mind 24/7. Hospice care provides a nurse to visit each week to answer medical questions and help stay on top of pain. Personal care agencies provide trained caregivers who can be there day and night to provide encouragement, reduce loneliness, and give extra assistance as needed. Both agencies usually work together to ensure their patients’ needs are met.

Personal care agencies 24/7 services include:

  • Shower assistance
  • Hygiene care
  • Medication reminders
  • Homemaking
  • Meal planning and preparation
  • Light housekeeping
  • Errands and transportation
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia care
  • Peace of mind for all involved

The most important thing to remember is that both of these agencies are on your side. They want to provide the best care for your loved one, and working hand-in-hand with one another provides the best support across the board. If your loved one is in need of hospice care services and you feel they would benefit from additional care and assistance, don’t hesitate to call on a good personal in-home care agency in your area.  

Learn more about Aspen Senior Care by calling 801-224-5910.

First and foremost, it is important to understand what hospice care is. The purpose of hospice is to provide the highest quality of care and comfort to those who are chronically ill, terminally ill, or seriously ill and to relieve or lessen the discomfort they may experience. 

Bonnie and Diana Elevation Hospice

Bonnie B. and Diana C. with Elevation Hospice

For those wondering if their loved one could benefit from hospice, Bonnie Bechek, an experienced hospice RN with Elevation Hospice, suggests to look for the following signs:

  1. Health changes, including incontinence
  2. Increased frequency and severity of falls
  3. Loss of appetite or unexplained weight loss
  4. Loss of strength
  5. Increase in sleep
  6. Mental changes
  7. Requiring more assistance in activities of daily living
  8. Increased need for medication to control pain and discomfort

Did you know?

The hospice benefits, which are covered 100% by Medicare, include:

  1. On-call nurse available 24 hours a day
  2. Management of pain and other symptoms
  3. Personal care, homemaker services, companion care
  4. Spiritual and emotional support – Social Work and Chaplain
  5. Incontinence and catheter care and medical supplies (briefs, wipes, etc.)
  6. Durable Medical equipment (wheelchair, etc.)
  7. Medications for pain and discomfort
  8. Respite care, wound care, and bereavement support

Being Mortal by Atul GwandeBonnie also recommends the book Being Mortal by Atul Gwande to all family caregivers who have a loved one needing hospice care. This book is Atul’s personal meditation on how we can better live with age-related frailty, serious illness, and approaching death.

Personal care agencies, like Aspen Senior Care, work hand in hand with the top hospice agencies to ensure our clients are receiving the care they deserve. Contact us at 801-224-5910 to learn more today.

 

 

How to prevent pressure sores in seniors

A better understanding of what causes pressure sores helps caregivers take better care of their elderly loved ones. A pressure sore (also known as pressure ulcer and bedsore) is a result of tissue getting compressed between bone and an external surface. Pressure sores affect seniors who are unable to move and change position regularly. Prolonged pressure on the compressed areas leads to reduced blood supply (and eventual death) to the skin and underlying muscle tissues. Skin becomes dry and flaky and can break open which allows bacteria to enter the wound. 

Pressure sores/ulcers are located in areas such as the head and ears, elbows, shoulders, heels, and the sacral region and are graded or staged to classify the degree of tissue damage.

A body indicating the areas of the body where pressure sores may occur

Pressure sores are characterized by four stages dependent on the severity and depth of the lesion

Stage 1:    Pressure sores involve the superficial skin layer. The area has prolonged redness or “non-blanchable redness” (the area is red and does not go back to normal color when the senior is moved). The area can also turn pale or shiny and white.

Stage 2: Pressure sores involve superficial lesions to the top layer of skin. This results in a shallow depression or abrasion causing skin breakdown, blisters, shallow craters, edema, drainage, and possibly infection.

Stage 3: Pressure sores have full skin loss and extension into the subcutaneous tissue causing necrosis, drainage, and localized infection.

Stage 4: Pressure sores have damaged the muscle, fascia, and bone with deep infections, drainage, and death of the tissue (necrosis). Consequently, when a senior enters this stage they will always have a stage 4 ulcer. Although pressure sores may heal on the surface, the sores are deep and usually slow to heal. Due to this, pressure sores re-open easily.

Image showing the 4 stages of pressure sores

In most cases, seniors have special skin care needs because their skin becomes dry and thin as they age. If it becomes too dry, skin is prone to cracking and dermatitis. In addition, this allows for the growth of bacteria which can result in infection. Prevention of and assessment for pressure sores/ulcers and skin tears will avoid discomfort and decreased quality of life for seniors.

Prevent pressure ulcers and skin tears:

  • Relieve pressure by off-loading weight  
  • Prevent shearing and friction with careful transfers
  • Provide good personal care
  • Adequate nutrition and hydration
  • Loose, non-binding clothing

What can you do as a caregiver?

  • Reposition often: seniors need to be turned frequently to avoid pressure-sensitive ulcers.  
  • Check skin and all pressure points frequently
  • Give good skin care: powder which keeps areas clean and dry, lotion which keeps skin hydrated and elastic
  • Give good perineal care—toilet often and clean area well
  • Help the client exercise regularly – whatever the client is capable of doing
  • Make sure bed linens are clean, dry and wrinkle free
  • Give gentle massages to increase blood flow
  • Encourage fluids and good nutrition
  • Use pressure reducing devices: pillows, coccyx cushion, air mattress, barrier cream

What should you report to the doctor, Home Health nurse, or other healthcare providers?

  • Redness that won’t go away
  • Pale, white, shiny area over a bony prominence
  • Red, hot, tender to touch
  • Pressure ulcer that has increased in size or depth
  • Senior reports pain
Aspen Senior Care team photo

Aspen Senior Care has won Provider of Choice for 8 years in a row!

Aspen Senior Care trains our caregivers to follow these guidelines to ensure we provide our clients with the best possible care. We know how important it is to have caregivers our clients can trust. Because of this, we provide monthly in-service training to cover important educational topics. This improves the quality of life for both the caregiver and the senior receiving care.  Click here to learn more about our professional caregivers.


 

Information presented by Amanda Hensler

First Choice Home Health & Hospice

How do family caregivers know when hospice care is right for their loved one? Many people don’t understand hospice and immediately reject considering it because they think it means giving up. But hospice care is not giving up. It is about changing focus to a different set of goals – goals that will provide comfort care and quality of life. Continue reading “What Family Caregivers Need to Know about Hospice” »